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October 26, 2018

Blog: Why disability is important to retail

Last week Mike Adams talked about the origin of Purple Tuesday, and why it is so important to him and disabled people.

As Retail Sector Champion, I wanted to say a few words about why disability is important to retail.

As Co-Chair of the Government’s retail roundtable I can say I was there when Mike first made the suggestion last November. It was a fantastic idea and an easy proposition for everyone to support. And the number of retail outlets, shopping centres and landlords signing up every day reinforces the willingness of retail, as a whole, to make the shopping and leisure experiences a pleasure for everyone.

At Revo, we launched our Accessible Places toolkit containing a range of practical resources, supporting the sector navigate its way through issues of disability. In so many ways, Purple Tuesday is a natural extension of this, with retail companies making public commitments to introduce at least one new initiative – and to embed it into the DNA of what they do. I have been amazed and humbled by the ideas and creativity in equal measure. From organisations who are supporting their staff to learn hello and goodbye in British sign language, commitments to reflect disability and disabled people in marketing campaigns, the creation of a disability module, through to an audit of website accessibility and commitments to improve signage.

Collectively, these commitments will make a huge impact. The retail sector can have such an enormous part to play in making retail places up and down the country inclusive and welcoming to people and families with disabilities.

I am proud to be associated with Purple Tuesday and so should you.

Samantha Sen

Retail Sector Champion for Disability

October 22, 2018

Blog: Let’s turn the UK purple together

With 24 days to go until the first Purple Tuesday, I continue to be astounded by how much interest and support we are receiving. The last three months have been a whirlwind, from our launch on Sky News (which we could not have anticipated, and which catapulted a vision into a reality) to today when we are at over 300 registrations of interest and expecting upwards of 500 organisations on the day. I have spoken to many of you already and am committed to speaking to as many of you personally as possible either before, during or immediately after Purple Tuesday.

I am first and foremost a CEO and business leader in my own right, but as a disabled man Purple Tuesday will always be about more than it just making business sense.

During my childhood disabled people were in many ways not to be seen, or if we were, were seen as beneficiaries of charity and users of welfare and care. I used to get taken on my school ‘happy bus’ as we called it, from my special school in Sussex once a month to the nearby town where we were taken into one shop as a ‘treat’ and able to spend any pocket money our parents had provided. The shop and town itself treated our arrival like a special event. I very much felt a disabled person, rather than a person first who happened to have a disability.

Fast forward to 2018, and the world is a very different place for sure. Our towns and shops are far more accessible, and I believe I am generally treated the same as people who do not have a disability. But I still feel a sense of trepidation. Shop staff are still unsure of engaging with me – not because of prejudice, but a fear of unintentionally offending me through the wrong language or etiquette. This results in them swerving the conversation altogether. This can make life feel ‘very disabled’ when I go shopping. Physical access still remains an issue for me. Many stores have wheelchair access now, which is great, but it’s when you get inside the difficulties can start with crowded layouts making it very difficult to get around without damaging anything. Essentially my shopping experience can be stressful, which in turn puts me off going (if you put aside the fact I don’t like shopping anyway!), which in turn means I potentially don’t make purchases.

These experiences are not unique to me which is why I created Purple. A company that for the first time would uniquely bring together an understanding of disability and an understanding of business, with a vision and mission to create true societal change for the benefit of both.

Purple Tuesday is an embodiment of that vision. It will bring together disabled consumers with retailers to raise awareness of the barriers and experiences of disabled people, whilst also fully acknowledging it is not about one day. It is about a commitment to accessible services and understanding the challenges business also face. True change doesn’t happen in one day or overnight.

I truly believe we are on the brink of something big which can make a difference to the everyday lives of disabled people as well as the wider business cultural attitudes towards disability. We have already had international interest in the day and we can show the world how its done, firmly establishing the UK as leaders in this field.

So let’s do this. Let’s make 2018 the year of the first accessible shopping day, and the catalyst for making the UK a more accessible place.

Mike Adams OBE

Chief Executive Officer, Purple

 

To register your interest to take part in Purple Tuesday, please visit purpletuesday.org.uk

Already registered for Purple Tuesday, but want to find out more about how Purple can support you to deliver your commitment to improve accessibility? Please click here to find out more about Purple’s membership offer.

 

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